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Importers, brokers rush to get BOC accreditation

By Evelyn Macairan (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 27, 2014 – 12:00am protest-outside-the-BOC-main-office-9

MANILA, Philippines – Importers and Customs brokers are racing against time to secure their accreditation with the Bureau of Customs (BOC).

BOC-Account Management Office head Jemina Sy-Flores yesterday said their office has been flooded with applications that would allow importers and brokers to continue their transactions with the bureau.

The accreditation of 1,500 of the 12,000 accredited importers and 460 of the 2,000 Customs brokers has been approved as of Wednesday.

Flores said they noticed the spike in applications since Friday. “During normal days, we process between 50 to 100 folders or applications a day, but since last Friday the number of applications went up to 300, last Monday it became 400 plus and last Wednesday we processed 500 applications,” she said.

She said their personnel had to work overtime and look for additional people to accommodate the applicants.

She said they expect the number of applicants to further increase as the June 30 deadline set by the Department of Finance (DOF) draws near.

“We are not processing in full. We are only processing those that would soon expire, or those in the months of June and July, so their accreditation would not be cut off,” she said.

When asked if their office would accept applications this weekend, Flores said, “this has not yet been discussed but if ever, we are willing if there is an order.”

The BOC official attributed the late filing to the Filipino habit of waiting until the last minute to get a job done. “When it is close to the deadline, it is when they would be in a hurry, when in fact the changes in the accreditation were announced last December and formalized last February,” she said.

Flores said Customs Commissioner John Philip Sevilla has approved their request for a three-month extension or until Sept. 30, but the DOF has yet to come up with a decision.

Revalidated accreditation is valid for three years.

Armando Chan, a Customs broker, said the BOC should just allow their accreditation, which they renew every year, to expire before requiring them to comply with the DOF memorandum.

“We have written to Commissioner Sevilla but our letters have been ignored. (If they would allow this situation to go on) economically the government would also suffer because no one would import and the BOC would have no collection. If no one will file an import entry, what will they collect… The BOC is already short in its collection,” he said.

Meanwhile, some 20 Customs brokers wearing white shirts and black ribbons staged a protest outside the BOC gate yesterday morning.

Customs spokesperson Charo Logarta-Lagaon said the brokers’ holiday did not hamper the bureau’s operations.

The holiday was held to protest the implementation of the memorandum orders issued by the DOF, Bureau of Internal Revenue and BOC requiring them to secure accreditation from the BIR before they could transact with the BOC.

One of the reported requirements of the memorandum is a certificate of true copy from the Securities and Exchange Commission of the Customs brokerage firm’s registration.

Brokers are also required to get clearance from the BIR.

Moving Cars to the Philippines

from Philippine Bureau of Customs

1. CAN ANYONE BRING IN A MOTOR VEHICLE?

Yes, provided that the motor vehicle is brand new. Under Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Circular 92, Series of 1995, dated October 15, 1995, the importation of a brand-new motor vehicle of all types, including motorcycles has been liberalized and would no longer thus require prior authority to import.

2. WHEN IS A MOTOR VEHICLE BRAND NEW?

A motor vehicle is brand new if and only if the following criteria are satisfied:

  1. That the motor vehicle is of current or advance year model;
  2. It has never been registered or used;
  3. It is covered by a certificate of first ownership;
  4. Of the year of the immediate preceding year in the country of origin and/or manufacture provided that:
    1. The motor vehicle has a mileage of not more than 50 kilometers and;
    2. The motor vehicle has been acquired by the importer from the dealer as first owner.

3. HOW ABOUT MOTOR VEHICLES NOT OF CURRENT OR ADVANCE YEAR MODEL?

They shall be processed as in used motor vehicle.

4. WHAT ABOUT USED MOTOR VEHICLES?

Only qualified individuals may bring in a used motor vehicle which shall be duly covered by a prior authority to import. Under appendix 1-D of BSP Circular-Letter, Series of 1995, dated October 19, 1995, the importation of used vehicles continue to be regulated and would therefore require prior authority from the Bureau of Import Services (BIS), Department of Trade and Industry (DTI).

5. WHO IS QUALIFIED TO IMPORT USED MOTOR VEHICLES?

Under Executive Order No. 284 as implemented by BIS, in relation to BSP Circular-Letter, Series of 1995, dated October 19, 1995, the following individuals maybe allowed to bring in used motor vehicles:

  1. A returning Filipino or a former Filipino citizen who has stayed abroad for more than a year;
  2. An immigrant to the Philippines (shall be at least a holder of a 13G Visa duly issued by the Bureau of Immigration and Deportation).

Provided further that:

  1. Only one (1) unit motor vehicle per family is allowed to be brought in. (A motorcycle is considered a motor vehicle for this purpose).
  2. The vehicle is registered in his name for at least six (6) months prior to shipment to the Philippines;
  3. Proof can be presented that the vehicle was acquired out of the earnings abroad.

6. IS PERSONAL PRESENCE OF THE CAR-OWNER NECESSARY?

Personal presence by the car-owner of the used motor vehicle is required.

7. IS THERE ANY OTHER RESTRICTION ON THE MOTOR VEHICLE THAT MAY BE BROUGHT IN?

Yes. Whether brand-new or not, the motor vehicle should be left-hand drive.

8. IS THE IMPORTED VEHICLE SUBJECT TO TAXES AND DUTIES?

Yes. Whether brand-new or used, purchased or donated, the imported vehicle is subject to 40% Customs duty, 10% VAT and Ad Valorem Tax from 15% to 100% depending on its piston displacement. Its book value serves as the tax base and not the purchase price nor the acquisition cost. The book value is sourced from universally accepted motor vehicle reference books such as the Red Book, Blue Book, World Book depending on the origin of the imported vehicle.

9. ARE SPARE PARTS SENT WITH THE MOTOR VEHICLE ALSO TAXABLE?

Yes. These are taxed separately.

10. HOW CAN WE INQUIRE THE TAXES AND DUTIES PAYABLE?

By writing and providing information about the vehicle as to the make, brand, year model, piston displacement, Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) or chassis number or sending a copy of the registration to:

Valuation Center & Library
Bureau of Customs
South Harbor, Manila

and

One Stop Processing Center
Motor Vehicle
Manila International
Container Port
North Harbor, Manila

11. ARE THERE OTHER CHARGES ASIDE FROM TAXES AND DUTIES?

Yes. There are other non-customs charges that may be due on the shipment such as: storage and arrastre fees which may be collected by the privately-owned arrastre operator; by the shipping line and wharfage dues by the Philippine Ports Authority (PPA).

12. HOW IMPORTANT IS THE PRIOR IMPORT AUTHORITY (PIA)?

It is very important if the vehicle would not qualify as brand-new as herein defined. A used motor vehicle not covered by PIA shall be seized and may only be released upon payment of heavy penalties on top of the taxes and duties due thereon.

13. HOW IS PIA OBTAINED?

By submitting to BIS a duly accomplished application form which may be obtained from it and the following documents duly authenticated by the nearest Philippine Consulate abroad where the car-owner resides:

  1. Proof of his continuous stay abroad for at least one (1) year;
  2. Copy of the registration papers showing that the vehicle is registered in his name for at least six (6) months;
  3. Proof that the car was acquired out of the earnings abroad.

14. WHERE IS THE BIS LOCATED?

The address is as follows:

Bureau of Import Services
3rd Flr., Welding Industries of the Philippines Building
349 Sen. Gil Puyat Avenue Makati City, Metro Manila
Tel. No. (632)895-7466

15. IS DEPRECIATION IN VALUE ACCORDED TO IMPORTED VEHICLES?

Yes, if the imported motor vehicle is an older model or an earlier than the current year model. The depreciation schedule is 10% per year counted downwards from current year which has a depreciation rate of zero percent (0%). Motor vehicles with a piston displacement of 2000 cc and above may be given a maximum depreciation of 50%, while those below 2000 cc, up to the maximum of 70%.

16. IS THE IMPORTATION OF MOTOR VEHICLE SUBJECT TO PRE-SHIPMENT INSPECTION (PSI) BY SGS IN THE COUNTRY OF EXPORTATION?

Under Joint-Order 1-91, individually owned motor vehicle is not subject to pre-shipment inspection by SGS. The importation thereof need not be covered by a Clean Report of Findings (CRF) issued by SGS. Non-individually-owned vehicles or those imported for commercial purposes should therefore undergo PSI and their importation should be covered by CRF.

17. HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO CLEAR MOTOR VEHICLE IMPORTATIONS FROM CUSTOMS?

Given a complete documentation, clearance for the release of the imported vehicle in the One Stop Processing Center (OSPC) takes place within forty-eight (48) hours from the filing of Customs entry.

18. ARE IMPORTATIONS OF BOATS, YACHTS AND MOTORIZED FARM IMPLEMENT ALLOWED?

Yes, subject to payment of taxes and duties.

Pet to Go

petmoverslogoAIMS offers  comprehensive pet moving services to and from the Philippines, under its Pet to
Go division.  We are a proud member of International Pet and Animal transportation Association IPATA, which adheres to the highest international standards in transporting pets and animals.  Being pet owners ourselves, we understand the stress that are involve when transporting a pet, thats why we are so committed in making the experience as pleasant as possible, both for the Pet and for their owner.

The Art of Moving

art-of-movingAIMS ensures you of a safe and worry-free move to and from the philippines.  We take pride in saying that we are one of the reliable moving company in the Philippines. We guarantee to provide you with our excellent service at a very competitive price that surely would fit your budget.

Moving is an art by itself.  A mover should love what he does and turn it into an art rather than a career.  With our decades of experience in the moving industry, it became a passion and our constant trophy is providing our clients with a perfect move.

Our professional packers/unpackers has the knowledge and expertise in packing your items to ensure your goods are securely packed and adequate materials are used.  They are the craftsman of the trade.

Through years of experience, our careful and strong movers attained the most effective method and techniques in moving your valuable property.

Our friendly and courteous management and staff is at your disposal.  You can always rely on us anytime you need assistance.  Our service always come with a smile from start to completion of your perfect move.

Customs Clearance Division

customs-clearance-philippinesOur Customs Clearance Division is spearheaded by expert licensed customs brokers who have proven considerable experiences and expertise in efficient handling of incoming shipments (household goods and personal effects) most particularly diplomatic and single consignments from private and individual sectors.

With our very competitive rates and reliable network of agents nationwide, AIMS management and staff have successfully completed customs clearance and delivery of consolidated balikbayan containerized shipments from overseas Filipino Community and among valued clients are Middle East, Indonesia, USA and Canada.

Doggie Flight Training

By Associated Press, Published: September 11
LOS ANGELES — For $349, your dog can learn to fly.

pet-travel

Security checks and bumpy air are all in a day’s training at a Hollywood film studio to prepare your dog for a safe and calm flight.

The Air Hollywood class is billed as the first in a real fuselage on a sound stage with a simulator that mimics takeoff, turbulence and landing. Hollywood extras create crowds and chaos that come with terminals, luggage carts and the blare announcing arrivals, delays and departures.

The idea was the brainchild of Talaat Captan, president and CEO of Air Hollywood, the world’s largest aviation-themed film studio, who noticed a dog owner having a rough go getting a pooch through airport security.

“The owner was stressed out and the dog was freaking out,” Captan said. “I figured, ‘Why don’t I train those people?’”

He hired his friend Megan Blake to write a program and teach the class with three other instructors and her dog Super Smiley. An actress, animal trainer and lifestyle coach, Blake also has a psychology degree from Georgia Tech.

With more dogs racking up air miles these days, it makes sense to take obedience school to a new level, said Heidi Heubner, who directs volunteers, including airport therapy dogs, at Los Angeles World Airport.

There are no numbers on how many pets are taking to the skies, but they have become essential parts of a growing number of families and traveling with them for work and play is becoming more common, said Kim Cunningham, a spokesman for the International Pet and Animal Transportation Association in Texas.

It will vary by airline, but there’s always a fee for cabin pets — those under 20 pounds that have to stay in carriers under the seat during a flight. Workings dogs or trained service animals (most airlines also allow psychiatric and emotional support animals, too) fly free, but owners must give the airline documentation and advance notice. The animals sit at their owner’s feet during flights. The class doesn’t address cargo pets.

The class is using the same studio where parts of “Bridesmaids,” ‘’Kill Bill” and 500 other movies were made. Television scenes from “NCIS,” ‘’Modern Family” and “The Newsroom” have also been filmed there.

Last year, Air Hollywood conducted a test class with 60 puppies from Guide Dogs for the Blind.

“Some of the handlers were more nervous than the dogs because they don’t like to fly,” said Rick Wilcox, who oversees puppy-training in Southern California. “It was amazing how realistic it was.”

Two things are deliberately absent in the simulated airport: the smell of jet fuel and a change in cabin pressure that makes your ears pop.

Captain opened his studio about six months before Sept. 11. On Sept. 12, the phone started ringing because airports were locked down and movie and television studios couldn’t shoot scenes they needed.

The studio has grown to include everything from a private jet to a 747, as well as props and supplies.

A guide dog takes longer and costs more than any other dog to train because they must be the eyes of their companion. So it wasn’t surprising “that they all went through with flying colors,” Blake said. Going through security, none of the dogs balked or barked at the security wands or pat-downs, even if the wands set off alarms because of their leashes.

The dogs sat at their handlers’ feet in the cabin during the simulated flight, which came with engine sounds, the captain speaking, cabin lights being dimmed, overhead bins being shut and warm-up vibrations, Wilcox said. If there was any nervousness, it was during the simulated takeoff, landing or turbulence.

When a dog gets nervous, it might clamp its jaw, lick its lips or get wide-eyed, Blake said. With the dogs in the test class, petting was enough to reassure them, she said.

The staff was very knowledgeable about dog behavior and gave good advice, Wilcox said.

“’If a dog gets nervous, don’t coddle them.’ That’s the same thing we use to raise confident, well-balanced dogs,” Wilcox said.

The studio is taking reservations for its first paid daylong class on Oct. 19. Classes will be held every month or two and will be open to well-behaved dogs of any age.

Captan and Blake’s collaboration isn’t the first time they’ve worked together on a sound stage. He was the producer and she was an actress in the science-fiction thriller “Digital Man” 18 years ago.